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CNC Machinging classes for CNC Machining program at NASCAR Technical Institute (Mobile)

CNC Machining Courses

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CNC Machinging classes for CNC Machining program at NASCAR Technical Institute (Mobile)

CNC Machining Courses

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An Inside Look at UTI’s CNC Classes

Ever wondered what you’ll learn in a CNC course?

As a student in UTI’s CNC Machining Technology program offered at NASCAR Technical Institute, you’ll learn basic machine shop skills, how to interpret blueprints, advanced manual milling operations and everything in between. By the end of this 36-week program, you’ll possess valuable knowledge and skills to start your career in the CNC industry.

Before beginning any type of training, it can be helpful to research the classes the program entails so you have an idea of what to expect. Keep reading to find out what you’ll learn in each CNC machine course:

Basic Machine Shop Skills

In this introductory course, you will learn to safely operate equipment in a machining environment. You’ll also learn about hand tools, saw types, saw blades, installation and removal and welding. This course primarily focuses on the proper care and use of semi-precision measuring equipment.

The machining industry requires daily use of mathematics. In this course, you will learn to demonstrate proficiency using fractions and use mathematics, precision measuring equipment and proper workpiece layout for manual machining. You will also be introduced to the use of hand tools on a drill press.

Key takeaways

  • How to operate equipment and work safely in a machining environment
  • Proper care and use of various tools and semi-precision measuring equipment
  • How to utilize and apply mathematical concepts that relate to the CNC industry

Tools & technology used

  • Drill pressures, vertical and horizontal band saws, grinders, manual lathes, manual mills and CNC turning and machining centers
  • Band saw and drill press
  • Semi-precision measuring equipment such as rules, calipers, adjustable squares, combination sets, protractors, bevels, surface plates and gage blocks

Mathematics, Materials and Maintenance

You will learn about ferrous and nonferrous material compositions and heat-treatment methods in this course. You’ll also learn about various material hardness-testing methods and measurement scales.

In order to improve your mathematical skills, you will demonstrate proficiency in algebraic calculations, as well as calculating ratios and proportions. Additionally, you’ll learn about the use of precision measuring equipment and how to maintain machines in a machine shop by learning why and when to perform periodic maintenance.

Key takeaways

  • Basics of ferrous and nonferrous material compositions, heat-treatment methods, material hardness-testing methods and measurement scales
  • How to calculate ratios, proportions and algebraic equations as they relate to the CNC industry
  • How to use precision measuring equipment and maintain machines through performing periodic maintenance

Tools & technology used

  • Precision measuring equipment such as micrometers and plunge indicators, Rockwell hardness scale and refractometer

Interpreting Blueprints/Job Layout

In this course, you will begin reading blueprints to learn about their layout and the information presented. By understanding the parts and their corresponding prints, you’ll gain an understanding of inter-related feature relationships.

You will learn to use a manual lathe after having learned proper work and toolholding techniques, and you are also introduced to the manual mill. Topics covered include mill-specific cutting tools and toolholding and workholding devices. You will use mathematics, precision measuring equipment and proper workpiece layout for manual machining.

Key takeaways

  • Introduction to blueprint reading
  • Proper work and toolholding techniques
  • Use of manual lathes and mills
  • How to use mathematics, precision measuring equipment and proper workpiece layout for manual machining

Tools & technology used

  • Manual lathes, vertical milling machines and various benchwork layout equipment, including scribes, layout fluid, combination sets, dividers, trammels, center punches, protractors and calipers

Manual Machining Basics

Topics covered in this course include manual lathe operations and vertical milling setup. You will be taught the skills necessary to ensure proper and accurate use of manual lathe and milling machines to create various part features.

The course concludes with a conversation about offhand grinding equipment, as well as information relating to grinding wheels. You’ll also learn to safely deburr parts and sharpen cutting tools.

Key takeaways

  • Manual lathe operations
  • Vertical milling setup
  • Introduction to offhand grinding equipment and grinding wheels
  • How to safely deburr parts and sharpen cutting tools

Tools & technology used

  • Pedestal grinders, manual lathes and milling machines

Manual Machining on the Lathe

You will develop an understanding of manual lathe threading and taper turning in this course. You will also be taught the skills necessary to ensure proper and accurate use of the manual milling machine to create various part features. The course concludes with a conversation on indexing head operations.

Key takeaways

  • Manual lathe threading
  • Taper turning
  • Indexing head operations

Tools & technology used

  • Manual lathes and milling machines

Manual Machining on the Mill

In this course, students dive into advanced manual milling operations. You will be taught the skills necessary to ensure proper and accurate use of the manual milling machine to create various part features. Special emphasis is placed on angular milling and complex milling operations, and you will also learn geometry and trigonometry concepts required to accurately perform these operations.

Key takeaways

  • Advanced manual milling operations
  • Angular milling
  • Geometry and trigonometry for CNC operations

Tools & technology used

  • Manual mills

CNC Basics

This course covers the aspects of Computer Numerical Control that apply to both turning and milling operations. Subjects such as automatic tool changers, the machine control unit, motion control, coordinate systems and positioning systems are covered in detail. You will learn programming concepts such as word addresses, G and M codes and tool movement commands.

Students also get exposure to the structural parts of a CNC program as well as an introduction to conversational programming. You’ll learn about CNC turning machines, and work and toolholding devices, as well as cutting tools used in CNC turning. Included in this course are in-depth conversations regarding the Continuous Improvement component of quality assurance vs. quality control.

Key takeaways

  • Automatic tool changers
  • The machine control unit
  • Motion control
  • Coordinate systems
  • Positioning systems
  • Programming concepts such as word addresses, G and M codes, and tool movement commands
  • Introduction to conversational programming
  • Quality assurance vs. quality control

Tools & technology used

  • Haas control panel simulators

CNC Turning I

Programming for CNC turning applications is the primary focus of this class. Students learn about CNC turning machines, toolholding and workholding devices, as well as cutting tools used in CNC turning.

Utilizing content learned in this class, you will begin writing your own programs. Some of the many subjects covered include tool changes, sequence numbering, program stops, coolant codes and canned cycles, as well as various turning operations. The Continuous Improvement component of buy vs. make analysis concludes the course.

Key takeaways

  • Programming for CNC turning applications
  • Tool changes
  • Sequence numbering
  • Program stops
  • Coolant codes
  • Canned cycles
  • Turning operations
  • Buy vs. make analysis

Tools & technology used

  • Haas control panel simulators

CNC Turning II

This course focuses on the setup and operation of CNC turning centers. You will learn to utilize control panel buttons, keys, dials and knobs to control the lathe, as well as to load, display, edit and run programs. You’ll also learn to set up workholding devices and account for coordinate system differences, tool geometry and wear offsets, as well as enter and prove out programs.

At the conclusion of the course, you will run programs at full feed, speed and rapid capabilities through use of auto mode. You’ll also learn about the Continuous Improvement components of just in time and Six Sigma.

Key takeaways

  • Setup and operation of CNC turning centers
  • How to utilize control panel buttons, keys, dials and knobs to control the lathe
  • How to load, display, edit and run programs
  • How to set up workholding devices and account for coordinate system differences
  • How to tool geometry and wear offsets and enter and prove out programs
  • How to use auto mode to run programs at full feed, speed and rapid capabilities

Tools & technology used

  • CNC turning centers

CNC Milling I

This course begins with an introduction to the various types of milling machines and toolholding types used in milling machines. The course’s primary focus is on programming for CNC mills.

As a student, you will begin writing your own milling programs using the content learned in this class. You will also complete a lab exercise in material resource planning (MRP), which is part of Continuous Improvement.

Key takeaways

  • Introduction to various types of milling machines and toolholding types used in milling machines
  • Programming for CNC mills
  • How to write milling programs
  • Material resource planning (MRP)

Tools & technology used

  • Haas control panel simulators

CNC Milling II

This course focuses on the setup and operation of CNC milling machines. You will learn to utilize the control panel buttons, keys, dials and knobs to control the mill as well as to load, display, edit and run programs. You’ll also learn to set up workholding devices and account for coordinate system differences, tool geometry and wear offsets, as well as enter and prove out programs.

At the conclusion of the course, you will run programs at full feed, speed and rapid capabilities through use of auto mode. The course concludes with the Continuous Improvement component of a capacity resource planning lab exercise.

Key takeaways

  • Setup and operation of CNC milling machines
  • How to utilize the control panel buttons, keys, dials and knobs to control the mill
  • How to set up workholding devices and account for coordinate system differences, tool geometry and wear offsets, as well as enter and prove out programs
  • How to utilize capacity resource planning

Tools & technology used

  • CNC machining centers

CAD and CAM

Through CAD software, you will be taught the different geometry types such as wireframes, solid models and surfaces. Different software types are discussed to aid students in the understanding of CAD/CAM. Through use of CAM software, you will learn about toolpaths such as 2D contour milling, face milling, holemaking, pocketing, contour turning and 3D milling.

Verification and simulation functions are used to ensure the tool(s) behave as expected and all machining details have been defined. You will learn about post-processing, a process of permitting the CAM software to write the CNC program. The course concludes with the Continuous Improvement summarization of change management.

Key takeaways

  • Introduction to various toolpaths and geometry types such as wireframes, solid models and surfaces
  • How to use verification and simulation functions
  • How to utilize post-processing
  • Change management in a CNC environment

Tools & technology used

  • Mastercam software on PCs

Want to Learn More About the CNC Machining Technology Program?

If you're interested in learning how you can register for the CNC Machining Technology program Just click the link below or call (800) 834-7308 to speak with one of our friendly Admissions Representatives.